I've moved!

Posted by DarthDilbert at 8/17/2010 10:36:00 PM

I've Moved

You can visit my new site over at http://returnoftheconservatives.wordpress.com

Thanks.
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Guess which party: Off-color Charlie Brown cartoon has city administrator in hot water

Posted by DarthDilbert at 7/14/2010 05:55:00 PM

A city of Dayton administrator is the subject of an internal investigation after she allegedly e-mailed a newsletter to employees that featured an off-color joke with Peanuts cartoon character Charlie Brown.

Employees received an e-mail on July 2 from Dynetta Brown-Griffith, the city’s Department of Water Safety administrator, with an attachment regarding safety in the workplace.

The cartoon appears next to a section headlined "Allergy Meds at Work," which details some allergy medications that might be harmful to use at work.

No disciplinary action has been taken yet by the city against Brown-Griffith, city spokesman Tom Biedenharn said.

Care to guess which party she belongs to? It should come as no surprise that Dynetta M. Brown-Griffith, of the 4200 block of Dobbin Circle, has been a registered democRAT since 3 January 1996. How's that Hope and Change workin' for you?

Dayton Daily democRAT News
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Muslims seek to add holidays on NY school calendar

Posted by DarthDilbert at 7/14/2010 05:50:00 PM

Muslim parents, students and civic groups are campaigning to add two of their religious holidays to the New York City public school calendar, pinning their hopes on state lawmakers after failing to win over Mayor Michael Bloomberg to the idea.

Putting Eid Ul-Fitr, a holiday marking the end of Ramadan, and Eid Ul-Adha, celebrating the end of the hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca, on the list of official school holidays will help ease suspicion and reduce anti-Muslim sentiment nearly a decade after the September 11 attacks, they say.



Reason # to homeschool.

Al Reuters
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I Do Not Like This Healthcare Plan

Posted by DarthDilbert at 7/08/2010 12:51:00 PM

From an email:

I do not like this Uncle Sam,
I do not like his health care scam.
I do not like these dirty crooks,
or how they lie and cook the books.

I do not like when Congress steals,
I do not like their secret deals.
I do not like this speaker Nan,
I do not like this "YES WE CAN".

I do not like your smug replies,
when I complain about your lies.
I do not like this kind of hope.
I do not like it. Nope, nope, nope.

ObamaCare
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Happy Independence Day!

Posted by DarthDilbert at 7/04/2010 01:48:00 PM

"Our lives, our fortunes, our sacred honor" by Rush H. Limbaugh, Jr. (as published in the July 1996 edition of The Limbaugh Letter)

It was a glorious morning. The sun was shining and the wind was from the southeast. Up especially early, a tall bony, redheaded young Virginian found time to buy a new thermometer, for which he paid three pounds, fifteen shillings. He also bought gloves for Martha, his wife, who has ill at home. Thomas Jefferson arrived early at the statehouse. The temperature was 72.5 degrees and the horseflies weren't nearly so bad at that hour. It was a lovely room, very large, with gleaming white walls. The chairs were comfortable. Facing the single door were two brass fireplaces, but they would not be used today. The moment the door was shut, and it was always kept locked, the room became an oven. The tall windows were shut, so that loud quarreling voices could not be heard by passersby. Small openings atop the windows allowed a slight stir of air, and also a large number of horseflies. Jefferson records that "the horseflies were dexterous in finding necks, and the silk of stocking was nothing to them." All discussion was punctuated by the slap of hands on necks. On the wall at the back, facing the President's desk, was a panoply-consisting of a drum, swords, and banners seized from Fort Ticonderoga the previous year. Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold had captured the place, shouting that they were taking it "in the name of the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress!"

Now Congress got to work, promptly taking up an emergency measure about which there was discussion but no dissension. "Resolved: That an application be made to the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania for a supply of flints for the troops at New York." Then Congress transformed itself into a committee of the whole. The Declaration of Independence was read aloud once more, and debate resumed. Though Jefferson was the best writer of all of them, he had been somewhat verbose. Congress hacked the excess away. They did a good job, as a side-by-side comparison of the rough draft and the final text shows. They cut the phrase "by a self-assumed power." "Climb" was replaced by "must read," then "must" was eliminated, then the whole sentence, and soon the whole paragraph was cut. Jefferson groaned as they continued what he later called "their depredations." "Inherent and inalienable rights" came out "certain unalienable rights," and to this day no one knows who suggested the elegant change. A total of 86 alterations were made. Almost 500 words were eliminated, leaving 1,337. At last, after three days of wrangling, the document was put to a vote.

Here in this hall Patrick Henry had once thundered: "I am no longer a Virginian, Sir, but an American." But today the loud, sometimes bitter argument stilled, and without fanfare the vote was taken from north to south by colonies, as was the custom. On July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was adopted. There were no trumpets blown. No one stood on his chair and cheered. The afternoon was waning and Congress had no thought of delaying the full calendar of routine business on its hands. For several hours they worked on many other problems before adjourning for the day.

Much To Lose

What kind of men were the 56 signers who adopted the Declaration of Independence and who, by their signing, committed an act of treason against the crown? To each of you the names Franklin, Adams, Hancock, and Jefferson are almost as familiar as household words. Most of us, however, know nothing of the other signers. Who were they? What happened to them?

I imagine that many of you are somewhat surprised at the names not there: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry. All were elsewhere. Ben Franklin was the only really old man. Eighteen were under 40; three were in their 20s. Of the 56 almost half -24- were judges and lawyers. Eleven were merchants, 9 were landowners and farmers, and the remaining 12 were doctors, ministers, and politicians. With only a few exceptions, such as Samuel Adams of Massachusetts, these were men of substantial property. All but two had families. The vast majority were men of education and standing in their communities. They had economic security as few men had in the 18th century. Each had more to lose from revolution than he had to gain by it. John Hancock, one of the richest men in America, already had a price of 500 pounds on his head.

He signed in enormous letters so "that his Majesty could now read his name without glasses and could now double the reward." Ben Franklin wryly noted: "Indeed we must all hang together, otherwise we shall most assuredly hang separately." Fat Benjamin Harrison of Virginia told tiny Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts: "With me it will all be over in a minute, but you , you will be dancing on air an hour after I am gone. These men knew what they risked. The penalty for treason was death by hanging. And remember: a great British fleet was already at anchor in New York Harbor. They were sober men. There were no dreamy-eyed intellectuals or draft card burners here. They were far from hot-eyed fanatics, yammering for an explosion. They simply asked for the status quo. It was change they resisted. It was equality with the mother country they desired. It was taxation with representation they sought. They were all conservatives, yet they rebelled.

It was principle, not property, that had brought these men to Philadelphia. Two of them became presidents of the United States. Seven of them became state governors. One died in office as vice president of the United States. Several would go on to be U.S. Senators. One, the richest man in America, in 1828 founded the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. One, a delegate from Philadelphia, was the only real poet, musician and philosopher of the signers (it was he, Francis Hopkinson - not Betsy Ross who designed the United States flag). Richard Henry Lee, A delegate from Virginia, had introduced the resolution to adopt the Declaration of Independence in June of 1776. He was prophetic in his concluding remarks: "Why then sir, why do we longer delay? Why still deliberate? Let this happy day give birth to an American Republic. Let her arise not to devastate and to conquer but to reestablish the reign of peace and law. The eyes of Europe are fixed upon us. She demands of us a living example of freedom that may exhibit a contrast in the felicity of the citizen to the ever increasing tyranny which desolates her polluted shores. She invites us to prepare an asylum where the unhappy may find solace, and the persecuted repost. If we are not this day wanting in our duty, the names of the American Legislatures of 1776 will be placed by posterity at the side of all of those whose memory has been and ever will be dear to virtuous men and good citizens."

Though the resolution was formally adopted July 4, it was not until July 8 that two of the states authorized their delegates to sign, and it was not until August 2, that the signers met at Philadelphia to actually put their names to the Declaration. William Ellery, delegate from Rhode Island, was curious to see the signers' faces as they committed this supreme act of personal courage. He saw some men sign quickly, "but in no face was he able to discern real fear." Stephan Hopkins, Ellery's colleague from Rhode Island, was a man past 60. As he signed with a shaking pen, he declared: "My hand trembles, but my heart does not."

"Most glorious service"
Even before the list was published, the British marked down every member of Congress suspected of having put his name to treason. All of them became the objects of vicious manhunts. Some were taken. Some, like Jefferson, had narrow escapes. All who had property or families near British strongholds suffered.

* Francis Lewis, New York delegate saw his home plundered and his estates in what is now Harlem, completely destroyed by British soldiers. Mrs. Lewis was captured and treated with great brutality. Though she was later exchanged for two British prisoners though the efforts of Congress she died from the effects of her abuse.

* William Floyd, another New York delegate, was able to escape with his wife and children across Long Island Sound to Connecticut, where they lived as refugees without income for seven years. When they came home they found a devastated ruin.

* Philips Livingstone had all his great holdings in New York confiscated and his family driven out of their home. Livingstone died in 1778 still working in Congress for the cause.

* Louis Morris, the fourth New York delegate, saw all his timber, crops, and livestock taken. For seven years he was barred from his home and family.

* John Hart of Trenton, New Jersey, risked his life to return home to see his dying wife. Hessian soldiers rode after him, and he escaped in the woods. While his wife lay on her deathbed, the soldiers ruined his farm and wrecked his homestead. Hart, 65, slept in caves and woods as he was hunted across the countryside. When at long last, emaciated by hardship, he was able to sneak home, he found his wife had already been buried, and his 13 children taken away. He never saw them again. He died a broken man in 1779, without ever finding his family.

* Dr. John Witherspoon, signer, was president of the College of New Jersey, later called Princeton. The British occupied the town of Princeton, and billeted troops in the college. They trampled and burned the finest college library in the country.

* Judge Richard Stockton, another New Jersey delegate signer, had rushed back to his estate in an effort to evacuate his wife and children. The family found refuge with friends, but a Tory sympathizer betrayed them. Judge Stockton was pulled from bed in the night and brutally beaten by the arresting soldiers. Thrown into a common jail, he was deliberately starved. Congress finally arranged for Stockton's parole, but his health was ruined. The judge was released as an invalid, when he could no longer harm the British cause. He returned home to find his estate looted and did not live to see the triumph of the revolution. His family was forced to live off charity.

* Robert Morris, merchant prince of Philadelphia, delegate and signer, met Washington's appeals and pleas for money year after year. He made and raised arms and provisions which made it possible for Washington to cross the Delaware at Trenton. In the process he lost 150 ships at sea, bleeding his own fortune and credit almost dry.

* George Clymer, Pennsylvania signer, escaped with his family from their home, but their property was completely destroyed by the British in the Germantown and Brandywine campaigns.

* Dr. Benjamin Rush, also from Pennsylvania, was forced to flee to Maryland. As a heroic surgeon with the army, Rush had several narrow escapes.

* John Martin, a Tory in his views previous to the debate, lived in a strongly loyalist area of Pennsylvania. When he came out for independence, most of his neighbors and even some of his relatives ostracized him. He was a sensitive and troubled man, and many believed this action killed him. When he died in 1777, his last words to his tormentors were: "Tell them that they will live to see the hour when they shall acknowledge it [the signing] to have been the most glorious service that I have ever rendered to my country."

* William Ellery, Rhode Island delegate, saw his property and home burned to the ground.

* Thomas Lynch, Jr., South Carolina delegate, had his health broken from privation and exposures while serving as a company commander in the military. His doctors ordered him to seek a cure in the West Indies and on the voyage he and his young bride were drowned at sea.

* Edward Rutledge, Arthur Middleton, and Thomas Heyward, Jr., the other three South Carolina signers, were taken by the British in the siege of Charleston. They were carried as prisoners of war to St. Augustine, Florida, where they were singled out for indignities. They were exchanged at the end of the war, the British in the meantime having completely devastated their large landholdings and estates.

* Thomas Nelson, signer of Virginia, was at the front in command of the Virginia military forces. With British General Charles Cornwallis in Yorktown, fire from 70 heavy American guns began to destroy Yorktown piece by piece. Lord Cornwallis and his staff moved their headquarters into Nelson's palatial home. While American cannonballs were making a shambles of the town, the house of Governor Nelson remained untouched. Nelson turned in rage to the American gunners and asked, "Why do you spare my home?" They replied, "Sir, out of respect to you." Nelson cried, "Give me the cannon!" and fired on his magnificent home himself, smashing it to bits. But Nelson's sacrifice was not quite over. He had raised $2 million for the Revolutionary cause by pledging his own estates. When the loans came due, a newer peacetime Congress refused to honor them, and Nelson's property was forfeited. He was never reimbursed. He died, impoverished, a few years later at the age of 50.

Lives, fortunes, honor
Of those 56 who signed the Declaration of Independence, nine died of wounds or hardships during the war. Five were captured and imprisoned, in each case with brutal treatment. Several lost wives, sons or entire families. One lost his 13 children. Two wives were brutally treated. All were at one time or another the victims of manhunts and driven from their homes. Twelve signers had their homes completely burned. Seventeen lost everything they owned. Yet not one defected or went back on his pledged word. Their honor, and the nation they sacrificed so much to create is still intact.

And, finally, there is the New Jersey Signer, Abraham Clark. He gave two sons to the officer corps in the Revolutionary Army. They were captured and sent to that infamous British prison hulk afloat in New York Harbor known as the hell ship "Jersey," where 11,000 American captives were to die. The younger Clarks were treated with a special brutality because of their father. One was put in solitary and given no food. With the end almost in sight with the war almost won, no one could have blamed Abraham Clark for acceding to the British request when they offered him his sons' lives if he would recant and come out for the King and Parliament. The utter despair in this man's heart, the anguish in his very soul, must reach out to each and one of us down through 200 years with the answer: "No."

The 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence proved by their every deed that they made no idle boast when they composed the most magnificent curtain line in history. "And for the support of this Declaration with a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor."

"It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more." - John Adams



On this July 4th, 2010 we celebrate the 234nd anniversary of our nation's independence. I hope everyone has a safe and wonderful Fourth of July!

Declaration of Independence
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Supreme Court rules that all Americans have fundamental right to bear arms

Posted by DarthDilbert at 6/28/2010 08:09:00 PM

The Supreme Court ruled for the first time Monday that the Second Amendment provides all Americans a fundamental right to bear arms, a long-sought victory for gun rights advocates who have chafed at federal, state and local efforts to restrict gun ownership.

The court was considering a restrictive handgun law in Chicago and one of its suburbs that was similar to the District law that it ruled against in 2008. The 5 to 4 decision does not strike any other gun control measures currently in place, but it provides a legal basis for challenges across the country where gun owners think that government has been too restrictive.

"It is clear that the Framers . . . counted the right to keep and bear arms among those fundamental rights necessary to our system of ordered liberty," Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. wrote for the conservatives on the court.

2nd Amendment

Washington Post
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democRAT Klansman Senator Robert Byrd has assumed room temperature

Posted by DarthDilbert at 6/28/2010 08:07:00 PM



This individual who Obama described as "a voice of principle and reason" once wrote a letter in 1944 to racist Senator Theodore Bilbo of Mississippi, about the move to integrate the armed services saying "I shall never fight in the armed forces with a Negro by my side... Rather I should die a thousand times, and see Old Glory trampled in the dirt never to rise again, than to see this beloved land of ours become degraded by race mongrels, a throwback to the blackest specimen from the wilds."

In death as in life, Robert Byrd has a white sheet over his head.

The Black Sphere
NPR
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Donald Domineck: Chairman of the Hypocrites 'R Us Project

Posted by DarthDilbert at 6/27/2010 04:50:00 PM

Donald Domineck, chairman of the Freedom Project, an outreach ministry of the Ethan Temple Seventh-day Adventist Church, led a protect Saturday against Bill Goodman's Gun & Knife Show at Hara Arena. He was quoted saying, "What we’re trying to do is let Hara Arena know that we don't appreciate 24 gun shows a year." First, Donny, there aren't twenty-four gun shows at Hara a year. According to Hara, there are only seven this year; but let's not allow facts to derail a liberal democRAT talking point.

As for Domineck, a registered democRAT since 25 May 1979, according to his Facebook page was "was elected a member of the democratic central comm.respresenting [sic] ward 5d in dayton view" on 4 May 2010. A quick glance at the results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections shows that he defeated his opponent Charles Taylor by a whopping one-third of the vote. The problem however is that out of 247 registered voters in the Dayton 5-D precinct only thirty-six people voted, and of those, only twenty-four voted for Domineck or 0.0971%. With those impressive numbers I'm certain that the DNC will enthusiastically encourage him to run in the 2012 primary against Obummer. Hope and Change!

His behavior is typical of democRATs today: Do as I say, not as I do. He complains that "kids have such easy access to guns". and yet is associated with a rap artist Clarence Winn, also known as, Chaos Tha Community Serva, whose organization Diamond Cut was classified as a street gang by the FBI. One of the members of Diamond Cut, Levy K. Smith, was sentenced to 10 years in federal prison after having been "charged with conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute drugs (crack cocaine and heroin) and for having a handgun while being a convicted felon." DDN conducted a five-month examination of area gang activity and found that law enforcement agencies in the Miami Valley have connected assaults, drug trafficking, shootings and homicides to more than a dozen local street gangs including that of Diamond Cut.

In addition to his convicted felon pal Smith, Winn also has a distinguished record with law enforcement having been "arrested twice on gun charges, according to Montgomery County court records. In one incident in March 2005, Dayton police found a loaded 9mm Ruger handgun on the floorboard of the black Chevrolet Impala that Winn was driving. Police were led to the car, parked in an alley in the 2100 block of Malvern Avenue, by witnesses who saw it leave the scene where a man had been shot in the neck on McCleary Street." I'm sure with the Diamond Cut gang in attendance, the upcoming "peace in da hood concert" will be calm, peaceful, and serene event.

Dayton Daily democRAT News
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Milwaukee County Supervisor Peggy West: Another reason to homeschool

Posted by DarthDilbert at 6/26/2010 09:32:00 PM



I feel very sad for the sad state of education in the city of Milwaukee. Schlitz may have made Milwaukee famous, but 12th District Supervisor Peggy West has made their school system a laughing stock. We know that they do teach United States geography there at least in the eighth grade in Milwaukee Government Schools, but it is unclear if she was busy at a LaRaza meeting that day.

Supervisor West, allow me to educate you: The state of Arizona shares a border with Mexico that spans approximately 375 miles. Comprehende?

The temptation to visit the website for the Arizona Office of Tourism and submit her address to receive "a full sized Arizona state map" is overwhelming. Your mileage may vary.

Milwaukee County Supervisor Peggy West is reason # to homeschool.

Hot Air
Tucson Citizen
WTMJ-TV
Michelle Malkin [1] [2]
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Obama: "I can't suck it up with a straw"

Posted by DarthDilbert at 6/24/2010 01:19:00 PM



But it appears he is willing to try...
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